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An obvious ploy

8/25/2014

An obvious ploy

An obvious ploy

Since a perceived national security threat arises from having unaccompanied Latino children cross the boundary of the U.S. and Mexico border, I have a proposal to make regarding how to handle this. Since it is an obvious ploy of their parents to get their children situated here as a precursor to getting here themselves later on when their children come of age, an established principal and practice already in the immigration law, I respectfully suggest all children unaccompanied by their parents be put up for adoption by U.S. citizens as soon as possible after arrival. In short order, this would sort out those U.S. citizens who do not want them here from those who do. If you are in favor of having them here, you should be first in line to offer sustenance and domiciliary care (on a permanent basis).

Practically speaking, the children would need to be sorted into two groups, those less than 13 years of age from those less than 19 years of age. It is much more difficult to get older children adopted than younger. So the younger could be adopted by potential parents who want them as totally legitimated children; the older children could be managed through agencies which would place them as foster children. In either case, all of these children would forthwith go through the U.S. public school system to become as equally advantaged or disadvantaged as any other children.

What about their parents' rights you say? I think parents who send underage children away without parental supervision have forfeited these rights. In this country, that might be classified as parental neglect. This likely would be to land the errant U.S. parent in the slammer. Why should these abandoned children's neglectful parents have more privileged forgiveness than our own neglectful parents have? Since these children's parents cannot be prosecuted under our laws for their negligence, the only fair recourse is to assure they never will become U.S. citizens later.

The children might make it; the parents will not.

Should all reasonable approaches to this problem (dilemma) -- such as my own -- fail, I can only suggest something somewhat more radical. As the 17th century Irish born English writer Jonathon Swift proposed as a means of managing the burden to the English of having too many Irish children's mouths to feed, we could turn the tables and boil and eat them.

Gary J. Whitesell,

Hays